UnSpun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation

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Includes where to look to have a better chance at finding good info Cons: One can't help but wonder in a book like this, if all of the presented info is accurate: Aug 13, Mary Ellen rated it really liked it Recommends it for: People interested in "unspinning" the media. Very well written and entertaining.

Chock full of useful info al conveniently laid out like lesson plans in deconstructing media. I may borrow some of their outlines for zine classes. Jun 02, Lori Vaughn rated it it was amazing. Aug 19, Lil Jen rated it it was ok. The first part seemed promising by expanding on tricks of the advertising trade, but the rest of the book fell flat. Dec 09, Andrew Canfield rated it liked it. Unspun provided some fascinating case studies and looks at the ways information can be manipulated. The authors, who helped start up FactCheck. Writing this could have been another public service of sorts, alerting people particular the target audience, which seemed to be older teens to young adults to the manner in which naivete is preyed upon in modern society and has been for generations.

Considering that Unspun provided some fascinating case studies and looks at the ways information can be manipulated. Considering that I studied advertising at UT Arlington UTA in college, this book held a particular interest for me; despite this, there just seemed to something be missing from it. Yes, there were good examples from the world of commercialism and politics, but the writing wasn't crisp and the authors seemed to repeat themselves quite a bit.

Maybe this could have been done for effectiveness, but it looked like it was more a result of poor editing. There was a feeling of "Been there before" when it came to most of the text. Again, there were some good elements to it, as paying attention to deceit in the public sphere is especially important in light of recent elections swung by low information voters in Great Britain and the United States. This book might be appropriate for a freshman college course and is a nice resource to shine a light on critical thinking building, but it felt like the authors left plenty on the table.

Apr 03, lia rated it really liked it. Thrilled mainly from the outset that it was current, addressed bias in the media in a seemingly straightforward way and was broken down into manageable mouthfuls. And it ended up to be true to what I had hoped for. A perfect book to teach from, and to gather tricks and tips for the sadly ubiquitous handout. My main problem, and it really is a problem, is that they decided, in order "to make this book as easy to read as possible" to omit "formal footnotes, end notes and appendixes giving full details on the source of each fact or quote".

Isn't that the point? Very disappointing and I am going to write them a letter to tell them so. Four stars, because even though they were preaching to the saved--I do think this will be useful in the classroom. Sep 15, Christine rated it liked it. I expected more from this book; really, it was more basic than my foundation-level reference class in library school.


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For nonlibrarians, or maybe people who just haven't thought about spin much before, this book would probably be good. Also, I wish they'd concentrated a bit more on finding information about political candidates and issues, rather than talking so much about consumer products. That said, I'd still make it required reading in high schools across America, if I had any kind of author I expected more from this book; really, it was more basic than my foundation-level reference class in library school.

That said, I'd still make it required reading in high schools across America, if I had any kind of authority. My favorite piece of advice came near the end: Cynicism, the authors say, is just another form of gullibility.

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Unspun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation

There are just as many people who will try to get you to believe something based on claims like "the government doesn't want you to know about xyz issue - but I'LL tell you! Aug 24, Claire rated it it was ok. I was bored to tears. This book gives insight into the world of the "spinners" and challenges the reader to consider both the said and the unsaid in making decisions in today's world.

I wouldn't recommend this to anyone my age, as i'm a teenager. Unfortunately, I have yet to gain in interest in the political world and I already understand the constant "spinning" in the advertisment industry. However, this book was incredibly well researched from page one and gives the readers newfound abbilities I was bored to tears. However, this book was incredibly well researched from page one and gives the readers newfound abbilities to analyze the things they see and hear in terms of bias, accuracy, and "spinning".

I'm sure that many others would appreciate this book more than I did. Jul 18, Jarrett King rated it liked it Shelves: This was a very informative book that came at a convenient time for this year's presidential election. All of the tips and pieces of advice are very useful and will help to clear up the mess that is the political ad war.

However, the tips got repetitive towards the last third of the book. Basically they started boiling down to "don't assume facts are true; research them to prove them right or wrong". However, many of the examples were entertaining and relevant to today's society, even if politic This was a very informative book that came at a convenient time for this year's presidential election. However, many of the examples were entertaining and relevant to today's society, even if politics dominated the examples.

Overall it is a good book that will change the way one looks at advertising and persuasion. Jul 07, Rachel rated it really liked it. This was published in and I read it in , which means two election cycles have passed and social media has become much more ingrained in our day-to-day life. It was fascinating and helpful to read but I would love to see an updated version that takes social media into account. Frankly, with the election already begun, it's worth a re-read, if only to make me take a look at myself and how I respond to political posturing and advertising.

This book should actually be required reading f This was published in and I read it in , which means two election cycles have passed and social media has become much more ingrained in our day-to-day life. This book should actually be required reading for the American public Oct 04, Jim rated it liked it Shelves: The anecdotes and examples are fascinating but the hidden message of this book is that Americans, by and large, have stopped thinking.

We've come to accept anything that comes out of the TV, internet and news media in all it's forms as the truth largely because we can't be bothered to take the time to think and search for the facts behind the spin, half-truths and out 'n' out lies.


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If nothing else, this books points out the need for a return to common sense and healthy skepticism without cynicis The anecdotes and examples are fascinating but the hidden message of this book is that Americans, by and large, have stopped thinking. If nothing else, this books points out the need for a return to common sense and healthy skepticism without cynicism.

May 05, M. This would be a good textbook for an intro to media studies class, or, for the most fortunate of librarians, a one credit information literacy course.


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The writing style is very journalistic, and universally accessible, despite the heavy Penn influence which I love, obvs. Sadly, however, this book had the misfortune of talking a good deal about the economy, and being published in , which pretty much immediately made it outdated. A second edition would be incredibly welcome. The ideas are th This would be a good textbook for an intro to media studies class, or, for the most fortunate of librarians, a one credit information literacy course. The ideas are there. It's almost, almost , a really good book. Feb 28, Azrielq rated it really liked it.

Critical thinking is such a rarity that I believe everyone should read this book. Not only does it review some of the common mental fallacies that influence our thinking, but it also delves into different techniques and sources one can use to help mitigate their effects. Written by the Factcheck. It also covers different scams and common techniques Critical thinking is such a rarity that I believe everyone should read this book. It also covers different scams and common techniques used by marketers.

unSpun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation by Kathleen Hall Jamieson

Mar 04, Donald Shank rated it it was amazing. This is one of the most important books a citizen can read, an indispensible guide for voters trying to cut through the bullshit of campaign stump speeches, political adds and candidate "debates". Read it with a critical eye, towards your own party as well as the opposition, because both sides will contort the truth and even lie, "advancing" their cause to the detriment of an honest public dialouge that is essential to good governance.

This book will teach you how to recognize spin, then how to This is one of the most important books a citizen can read, an indispensible guide for voters trying to cut through the bullshit of campaign stump speeches, political adds and candidate "debates". This book will teach you how to recognize spin, then how to get beyond it to the truth you need to make an informed decision. Jan 24, Robyn rated it liked it Recommended to Robyn by: While not earth shatteringly informative, this is a good reminder to keep our minds open and our skepticism healthy as we consume information.

I especially appreciated the section about considering sources. Just because a source has a bias doesn't mean it's inaccurate, but you should always be aware that the information could be candy coated, skewed or cherry picked so a smart consumer will beware. Oct 14, Jennifer Daniel rated it liked it Shelves: Even though I already doubt damn near every thing I hear this was still an interesting read.

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If nothing else I did learn how to "spin" my own stories to convince people to beleive me. It totally reinforced my theory that most people are mindless sheep and will go along with whatever someone else tells them. I so want to control the world! If only I had the perfect pair of shoes to wear while I was doing it. Aug 18, Meg rated it liked it Shelves: This book has lots of helpful info, especially during an election year, but it was a bit repetitive. I read it with a class, and by the end, I was ready for it to be over.

You definitely get the main point, though, so I guess the authors do a nice job of making a clear argument with lots of interesting examples. If you're going to read it, I would say you can skim most of it and easily get the gist. Apr 02, Marcia Buckie rated it it was amazing. I feel this is a such a great find: Everyone needs to critically examine data, especially with the decline in the quality of journalism and corporate fraud.

Its very user friendly, could be read by a someone as young as 11 or Its not a long read.. I really think everyone should read it!

Aug 20, Melissa Kerr rated it it was ok. This was not the most interesting book, but the stories amazed me. People are easily deceived, and it was nice to get tips on how not to. Some of the political anecdotes became a bore towards the end. Jackson and Jamieson equip us to be our own truth squad, and that just might be the salvation of democracy.

Better than anything written before, unSpun shows us how to recognize these scams and protect ourselves from them. Brooks Jackson runs FactCheck. More about Brooks Jackson. She has written… More about Kathleen Hall Jamieson. About unSpun Americans are bombarded daily with mixed messages, half-truths, misleading statements, and out-and-out fabrications masquerading as facts. Inspired by Your Browsing History. Looking for More Great Reads? Download our Spring Fiction Sampler Now. LitFlash The eBooks you want at the lowest prices.