Not Fit for Our Society: Immigration and Nativism in America

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Return to Book Page. Not Fit for Our Society: Immigration and Nativism in America by Peter Schrag.

Immigration and Nativism in America 3. In a book of deep and telling ironies, Peter Schrag provides essential background for understanding the fractious debate over immigration. Covering the earliest days of the Republic to current events, Schrag sets the modern immigration controversy within the context of three centuries of debate over the same questions about who exactly is fit for citizenship. He finds that In a book of deep and telling ironies, Peter Schrag provides essential background for understanding the fractious debate over immigration.

He finds that nativism has long colored our national history, and that the fear—and loathing—of newcomers has provided one of the faultlines of American cultural and political life. Schrag describes the eerie similarities between the race-based arguments for restricting Irish, German, Slav, Italian, Jewish, and Chinese immigrants in the past and the arguments for restricting Latinos and others today. He links the terrible history of eugenic "science" to ideas, individuals, and groups now at the forefront of the fight against rational immigration policies.

Not Fit for Our Society makes a powerful case for understanding the complex, often paradoxical history of immigration restriction as we work through the issues that inform, and often distort, the debate over who can become a citizen, who decides, and on what basis. Hardcover , pages.

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Not Fit for Our Society: Immigration and Nativism in America

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Peter Schrag masterfully presents the issues of nativism and immigration in the United States. He thoroughly researches the subject matter and presents it in a provocative and entertaining way.

The author is not afraid to criticize both sides of the aisle. Anyone with questions on the immigration debate should read this book. But all are mostly irrelevant to the emerging world. Jun 27, Walt rated it it was ok Shelves: Schrag covers a touchy subject. He does an excellent job of describing how the arguments against immigration "reform" have hardly changed over the past years. He includes an interesting discussion on America's eugenics programs of the s and s.

Not Fit for Our Society: Immigration and Nativism in America by Peter Schrag

Readers can be entertained in how eugencists and their supporters classified certain ethnic groups based on heavily biased tests; and how they needed to create the term "moron" as a classification between imbecile and feeble-minded person. Ente Schrag covers a touchy subject.

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Entertaining and unfortunate because so many felt and continue to feel this way. Most of the book relies on an excellent base of primary sources. Scholarly sources are referenced; but not as commonplace as one might expect in such a topic. The book takes a turn in the last two chapters and the conclusion. University of California Pr Bolero Ozon. Not Fit for Our Society: We can be grateful that in Not Fit for Our Society he has turned his gifts to the seemingly intractable problem of immigration.

We will have to settle this issue again, as we always manage to do despite enormous commotion and anxiety. Schrag will force everyone to think more clearly and to approach immigration with both compassion and good sense. In Not Fit for Our Society , Peter Schrag offers an invigorating, well-informed, carefully reasoned investigation into today's immigration debates. He links the terrible history of eugenic "science" to ideas, individuals, and groups now at the forefront of the fight against rational immigration policies.

Not Fit for Our Society makes a powerful case for understanding the complex, often paradoxical history of immigration restriction as we work through the issues that inform, and often distort, the debate over who can become a citizen, who decides, and on what basis.

About the Author

Peter Schrag, for many years the editorial page editor and later a weekly columnist for the Sacramento Bee, currently contributes to The Nation, Harper's, The Los Angeles Times, and other publications. He is a visiting scholar at the Institute for Governmental Studies at the University of California at Berkeley and the author of several books, including Paradise Lost and California: The Battle for Adequacy in America's Schools.

Contents Sources and Acknowledgments Introduction 1. A City upon a Hill 2. Preserving the Race 5. The Great Awhitening 6. Books Digital Products Journals. About the Book In a book of deep and telling ironies, Peter Schrag provides essential background for understanding the fractious debate over immigration.